Better Than Turkey

Ah the joy of the holiday season.  Loud, volatile and exhausting.  One can get too old for it – especially when they realize they were too old for it at about ten.  Growing up in New England is worse than having creamed onions shoved down your throat.  Or squash pie.  Instead, I read.  My, my, my – the many I read.  All of which were fulfilling in ways a meal simply isn’t.

The first was a never heard of  John Grisham “The Racketeer”.   Blew me away!  I hated to get to the end.  Plot plotting, twists, turns and sheer genius – I did not figure out the direction of the story which made it even better.  Read it!

I had plenty of titles from which to choose after the monthly book sale last week .   “Astrophysics for People in a Hurry” was next in line and my hilarious attempt at “getting it”.  So I spoke out loud to the damn book and kept asking Neil deGrasse Tyson – “but what was there before all this?” I did know what the Large Hadron Collider and Cern meant and I knew the bosons were named for a Bengali.  But I continued to ask “but what was there before?”  No reply.  I haven’t given up yet but I was never meant to be a astrophysicist.  As my daughter pointed out “These are very special people”.  And truly, what they know came with the package.  They have always known.  I love  Neil Tyson and his writing and his approach to this dark  territory  (black hole dark).  Check out Wiki and  go see about honest genius.  Go see about Neil.

Somewhere in there I slept.  Seriously.  But as the afternoon approached,  so instead of tea, I dug out “A Place at the Table” about a torn Chassidic teen who has grown away from his distinguished dynastic rabbi-filled family. It lets the reader see how he struggled to figure out how to have both without having to choose either. Without tragedy or defiance In some cases, alas, choosing is what MUST happen.  I always welcome books from this community because it enlightens me and makes me appreciate even more my Lubavitch friends and their open attitudes and divine humor. If this is your gleisel of tea- you will enjoy a well written and endearing novel; a place few of us see close up.  The author, Joshua Halberstam, did grow up in this same atmosphere and his insights are excellent. (I very much liked the fact  too, that he never specified which group he came from – discreet and very caring.) Take a short BMT ride to Boro Park. And don’t miss your stop.  You will find your place at the table (and a bissel Yiddish couldn’t hurt either.)

My house is filled with books  yet it always comes as a surprise to me how many I have read and how many I need to read.  And it’s like picking a kitten from a litter.  Or a puppy.  So that’s how I got to  Avery Duff’s “Beach Lawyer”.  Yes – that is the name and it was pretty entertaining for a first novel and a very juicy, well written lawyer tale.  Intricate plots told simply are a sign of something – and it takes more than a so-so writer to do it and when it happens – it is a delicious ride.  And of course lawyers can write.  Part of how they lawyer is their writing.  This one was set near my part of town and I did notice a couple of location errors* toward the end.  But…a wonderful hot day thriller.

Waiting for me are two books about diamonds – largely post alluvial stones from India and bag of new ones from today’s library run. Some are actually non-fiction!

A shortlist of authors that should be noted – Caro Fraser, Janet Gardam, new names from India and an entire array new, post holidays.  Darkness is falling, it’s not as hot today and there are books to open.  See you soon.  Comments always welcome.

 

*This is what happens when you copy edit as you read.

A Wait List Too Long

I am on a wait list that is trying my damn patience.  Not only that,  the “new books” shelves are not even appealing.  James Patterson is about to have his own Dewey Decimal number.  As a result of this tiresome wait I have been reading fascinating books I ignored at home and in the library.  A mystery (where eating and lots of drinking was featured) was formulaic but the subject was diamonds and I learned a great deal about diamonds.  This led me to more books about diamonds and seriously – aren’t diamonds a great subject?  They just never get old.

The ever prolific (does she ever sleep)? Joyce Carol Oates writing as Rosamund Smith showed up in a book called The Barrens -{which I happen to know about from The Sopranos}  that was so weird and mesmerizing I almost lost the plot line until she whipped it all together in a neat little package.  Mystery, madness, suburbia and a serial killer.  She nailed it in such a strange way I have to suggest you find a copy and see what you think.  And an author new to me – but one with a long title list – Suzanne Berne.  A Perfect Arrangement was very, very good.  Borderline obnoxious couple with kids I would have left in a bus station and the perfect nanny.  Not axe-murderer perfect – but impaired perfect.  I tend to really savor this type of couple story (many of which are not very appealing by page 20) when it’s good. It was so satisfying a little thriller that I got another of her titles.  A Crime in the Neighborhood is what I would be reading right now if I weren’t writing this.  Why does no one mention her?  Why didn’t I?  And Gwendy’s Button Box.  Just find it and read it.

I have figured out that I do like fiction or non-fiction equally.  Neil de Grasse Tyson (the Brilliant) arrived with a way (he thinks) to explain astro-physics to a fool like me.  I am going to read it when I can find a mindset that may help me try to get it.  Fermat’s Enigma has the same effect on me. But I keep trying.  Pythagoras had a lasting appeal but only for his “Commandments”, which I still regard with a smile.  Look them up.

Slowly working through Ta-Henisi Coates Eight Years We Were in Power.  Coates bears very serious reading time.  He does not waste a word and he does not suffer fools gladly.  Adam Gopnick’s newest is waiting – I do love his entire oeuvre – but mostly “Paris to the Moon”.  Patric Kuh on food in Los Angeles ( of which I was a very big part in the 80’s).  Unread MFK Fisher, books about French oysters and in closing ,I should mention  book I read about “Eels” was one of the most memorable natural histories ever.  If I had been on “Who (doesn’t) Want To Be A Millionaire”, I would have nailed an eel question for big bucks.

Why do I not include more details about authors and titles?  Because hopefully it leads you on a search that will help you see other books you may not have considered.  And I read so many  I don’t keep track.  Goodreads is great for this shortcoming.  So I strongly suggest you join the page and at least have a gander at what I want to and have read for more specific information.

Comments are always welcome.  Thank you for reading the blog.  And check out my other one; Voolavex.com

 

A Yawner in the Rye

I recently read a book I bought by mistake online and thought it still might be a good change from my usual titles and genres.  I won’t mention the name because it turns out it got RAVE reviews all over the whole creation.  I cannot agree with any of them and I found it work.  Set in 1914 England – it regales us with the poshspeak of the “betters” and their little town.  In over 400pp.  It is not Downton by any stretch of the imagination and I could not keep the characters straight no matter how I tried.  And tried how I felt.  I made it through three-quarters of this quiet and then suddenly hysterical tale of the war and how this little burg rose to meet the Hun.  I thought I might find some list of who’s who in the book online but did much better than that.  In one of the many “retell reviews”,  I got the whole plot and the spoilers and in doing so, shed a tear for Blighty and reached The End.  It was reviewed so well, but I think Julian Fellowes hit a better play between upstairs and downstairs and what was the done thing and the never done thing.  Frankly if the upper crust actually spoke in such euphemism it’s hard to imagine how anyone ever was born.

Waiting very patiently for the holds in my library to arrive – being on a massive wait list for all of them, but editing my own shelves I have found some overlooked titles and before they go to the Little Free Library belonging to a friend, I have found some good reading. And room on shelves for those orphans in piles on the floor.

The New York Times New Book Review awaits.  As long as they keep Marilyn Stasio busy with her “Crime” column I will be happy.

As a comment with little relation to anything so far – why can’t I love Orhan Pamuk as others do.  I tried again with “My Name is Red” and couldn’t do it.  Anyone else?

In fact I would love to have a list  of “books  readers simply cannot finish”.  I suspect we all have many. Send your titles and I will blog a list when we have enough.  Do it.  It should be fun

 

 

 

Do You Love To Read? Books, Magazines, Labels?

Welcome to Books –  A Revue*.  Not an ordinary book review site – but books I have loved or plan to read because I love the subject, the author, the contents.

Look for many titles and many subjects.  I read damn near everything.  Find enthusiastic recommendations and what I love about the book itself.   I have discovered that all writers have information to share that is good to learn.

I am a member of GOODREADS and enjoy it.  Check it out.

I do not negative sell.   Panning a book is a personal judgement and hardly means a book isn’t good or readable.  If I don’t like a book.  I stop reading it.  I might say it was not for me or use the term “pass”; but careers are lost on a bad review.  That’s not a risk I will take because I am not qualified to be a one person judge and jury.  That kind of judge and jury is easily bought.

I do not do plot summaries.  You can find a plot summary on Amazon, the book cover flap, the publisher’s website, Publisher’s Weekly or the on line public library (mine is the Los Angeles Public Library).  Check those if you are not familiar with the title or author.  I am not going to retell the story.  I will tell you the title and the author.

I welcome comments and suggestions; readers, writers, authors, publishers are all welcome to this blog.  I am a fan of many authors and many countries.  I read in English.  I have been doing this since I was about 4 and read Dick and Jane in one sitting.  And I write.  I still have my first (and only) completed novel manuscript from middle school.  It was filthy – and verbose and I am afraid to reread it now.  But I have it.

In the main, I write non-fiction and I am published.  I am willing to read any question, but may not answer it and if I do, you may not love the answer.  For exceedingly stupid questions I suggest QUORA.com – where I  am often asked and do answer queries. (hint: rarely am I asked about books on Quora).

I hope you will enjoy this blog and make suggestions – no chick lit though and no cookie, muffin, pot roast or other food mysteries.  I do worry about the new trend of author series – but I read them if I like the writer.  I have come to realize that the media creates literary fame – not readers of books.  I wish I didn’t realize that.  And I have liked books from the James Patterson Guild of Scribes – but I think they should have their own bestseller list.

*This a Revue – and because I could not locate my regular dictionary, I looked in my Le Robert Micro (French it is and blatant brag – I am not a Francophone however))  Essentially a revue can be complicated and on stage and usually musical, but it is also an inventory.  So this is my inventory in progress.