Voolavex Books A Revue: Many Tales

Finally back after a too long hiatus.  This is really a revue – like a Vaudeville show.  Lots of variety and a place for readers who aren’t really fond of traditional book reviews.  For example: “Do I really care about this one person’s opinion?”  This is the question you will not have to ask.

Sharing the books I like has no requirements.  You can like it or not.  But I have found so many authors, new to me, who have been a revelation and in turn have led me to look for others in locales I never considered before.  I have been reading like mad!!!  A weak explanation of why I have neglected this blog.

There is no format.  So far.  I have thought about formats and realized I was not a format writer, so I will just jump in.  Others, however, are welcome to suggest formats and I will happily consider them.  And contests (????).  Are they a good thing?  But this is not Goodreads.  I don’t care when you started or finished or which page you’re on.  I like Goodreads, but this is part of it I don’t love.  I would love for any Voolavex Books readers to share their finds. A little or a lot.

Dandy tips I have discovered.

Get a map.  If the locale is a real place – get a map.  It will put in the book and make it more vivid and many-layered.  You can google one, use a guidebook, or city guide.  Maps don’t change much in terms of streets so it doesn’t have to be new.  But I have many and I use them for fiction all the time. If it’s a made-up location, hope the author has provided one.  (I think they all should.)

Read with an accent if you can and phrasebook. This is true if the story is in a foreign location without a glossary.  Helps to know foreign expressions that actually matter to the story.  I tend to read with an accent if I can – seriously – if the book is set in another country – I try to imagine the voices of the characters.  Cats and dogs not included.

Guidebooks in general cover both these matters – usually cheap at thrift stores and yard sales.  Free at your local library.

Your local library.  I could buy books every day.  And to my dismay, this has created stacks all over my house.  Amazon has not been the only willing co-conspirator in this, but I love to use the library to reserve books via internet and it is even better.  Free.  How could free not be wonderful?  FYI – my local libraries are the Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL) and the Country Library of Los Angeles (COLA).  I do not read e-Books nor do I listen to audio books.  Just a personal choice. It’s the reading or listening that is the point no matter how.

Little Free Library.  Take one, leave one.  Usually little cupboards on posts that are little and free.  Supplied by donations and readers who like the idea of a quiet, community source.  We have two in my city that I know of.  I donate lots of books.

No Spoilers.  Not gonna’s do it.

What I read.  Everything and when I say this, I mean this.  Fiction, non-fiction, bio’s, series; I love thrillers (mysteries, suspense, crime, murder and mayhem). natural history. India.  All of it and especially Bombay.  Fiction and non. And France  – all of it, but Paris and Brittany are the top two. London.  Especially fond of Krazy Kat and Ignatz” and “Mutts”

I love science, geography, anthro, sociology, medicine, religion (all of them, but Jews in particular and Parsis).  Except for algorithmic math. (which includes DNA)  Tried to read “The Gene“; (full of math, it is) and slogged until I quit.  Apologies to Dr. Mukherjee.  Fermat’s Enigma is still just that.  I love The Fibonacci Sequence, though, and with that prime numbers.  I will never be a rocket scientist.  I LOVE Marilyn Stasio.  Crime columnist of the New York Times. She is the BEST!! (And This list goes on BTW).

What I don’t. Graphic novels (except Maus), Chick lit. Westerns, Military as a rule.  Politics (if I can help it especially now).  Self-help.  NO.

It evolves.

Ask questions, post comments and keep stopping by.  No schedule yet, but maybe one soon.

 

 

 

 

What’s On Your Nightstand?

As many know – I do not believe any of the authors queried in the NYT’s Sunday Review have  read most of those titles on the night table (or the floor or the shelves).   In my opinion anyway.   But I have some good ones at my side when I get in for a read and sleep.  What have I been reading?

In no order, “The Golden Legend”,  “They Cannot Pronounce My Name”, “Righteous” by Joe Ide, parts of the “Whitey/Billy Bulger” saga redux and “Inferno”, that has inspired me to read “The Hot Zone”.  Just began and before all else, Richard Preston can really write!  On Chapter Two and scared but hooked.  Fort Detrick is not a stop on any trip I may take to DC.  I thought bats were cute at one time.  That’s over.  I have never much liked monkeys and now they scare me to death. (chapter two – it is going to get much worse).  Steven Hatch in “Inferno” mentioned this book so often and this was so emphatic I knew it was important.  I will speak about it when I finish.  I finished “The Hot Zone”.

An amazing amount of detail and information written so well you could almost imagine this was a fictional what-if.  It isn’t.  It is about the filoviruses Ebola, Marburg and what they do to a body.  They are  soulless, serial killers, they have means but no motive and – hopefully limited or no opportunity.  And  they resist a cure.   Their vector may be bat blood.  Or not.  Ebola is blood borne – maybe.  I found Marburg to be even scarier but this book concentrated on Ebola andthe U.S. Military, the C.D.C. and  The Reston Level 4 infection zone. .  It allows us to follow the risks taken by very courageous men and women who investigated and contained an Ebola outbreak  in the Reston, VA  “Hot Zone”site.  It was harrowing and fascinating.*  I wish I had read it before “Inferno” – I would have been more scared – but having seen how the heroes in Liberia dealt with an outbreak, tempered my fear.  Sort of.  Robert Preston, the author of “The Hot Zone”  also made a trip to the suspected site of the Ebola virus ; The Kitum Cave, and that was terrifying.  He  also made some salient points in his observations of how the world is playing dangerous games with its ecology and its occupants.  He posited that perhaps these filoviruses are the planet’s own protection from the human destruction of nature.  Trees do not get Ebola, or HIV or Marburg. People and wildlife do – We play fast and loose with our world and continue to ignore our own destructiveness.  Perhaps our planet is aware of us and this is their own response.  I urge you to read “The Hot Zone” and “Inferno” and decide.  Comments are welcome especially on this threat.

What have YOU been reading?  My pick up list at the library is growing – and I am excited and will go up there in a day or two.  I think the NYT’s Review is a tad better and I must say any Times Sunday Review is always improved by the appearance of Marilyn Stasio. She reviews crime and mystery and she is the best.  I still wish that every story was not condensed and printed so the thrill falls away.  And I do write and post on Goodreads – but their site has lost too many of my fantastically written reviews I have stopped.  I am hoping they do get a save button.  I like the site and I like the readers I have met.  It also allows the reader to comment to the author and I find this wonderful. Polymath readers tend to fly far afield in their choice of subjects and this is a way to let an author know how much you enjoyed their book.

Aha. I just opened the library pickups from the tote and Faye Kellerman is top on the about to read list.  See you soon.

 

*For those who are sensitive to animals and laboratory testing – there are descriptions of  infected monkeys and euthanized  animals that I found sad and horrid.  So did the Army vets.   Just a caveat. And a subject I wish we considered more often.